PCs and tablets will suffer from crises more than smartphones: a negative 2022 is forecast

The reasons that, according to IDC analysts, will determine the downturn in PC and tablet sales in 2022 are the ones that have caused the projections of the smartphone market to deflate, only that they will have a greater impact. If for smartphones in recent days the same IDC analysts predicted a -3.5% compared to 2021, on PCs and tablets the impact will be greater: -8.2% for the former, -6.2% for the latter.

The two markets are held back by the consequences of the conflict in Ukraine, which, above all in Europe, are causing a surge inflationand the uncertainties that two years ago the pandemic has poured into the procurement of components and production activities in China, where those who assemble gadgets for the whole world have to deal with lockdown and restrictive measuresupstream and downstream of the production cycle.

Component shortages have tied the industry together for a while, and recent lockdowns in parts of China continue to exacerbate the problem as factories struggle to get parts from suppliers and also face problems when it comes to shipping finished products. – explained Jitesh Ubrani, an IDC manager.

In addition to the problems associated with the pandemic, war, inflation and restrictions in China are now added to the mix, said IDC executive Ryan Reith. […] Uncertainty remains high.

DESPITE THE DECREASE, NUMBERS REMAIN HIGHER THAN 2019

However, despite a decline in 2022, more “traditional” PCs – that is desktops, laptops and workstations – will be sold than in the pre-pandemic period. According to the company’s analysis, the driving force will be mainly demand in emerging markets, while in 2023at least PCs, they will revert to an evolutionary rather than an involutionary spiral.


However, this year’s negative percentages for PCs and tablets will greatly affect the compound annual growth rate (CAGR) in the five yearsup to 2026: a substantial stagnation is expected for the former (-0.6%), while for the latter a more important contraction (-2%).